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Tactics To Use When Coping With Your Depression

December 6th, 2018

Depression is a serious health condition affecting millions of people. In fact, clinical depression can lead to anxiety, insomnia, eating disorders and suicidal tendencies. Fortunately, there is some valuable information you can use to soothe your depression. If you would like to learn more about the options available to you, please keep reading.

If you have a feeling of depression, it is vital that you speak to someone who can help. Talking to people about how you feel, whether you speak to a friend, relative or medical professional, can be helpful.

Face the issues you have in your life, rather than hiding from them. Proceed with small incremental steps so you don’t become overwhelmed, and tackle issues on an individual basis. You can get a handle on your depression and lessen its effects by taking this one step at a time approach.

 

You need to know that you’re not crazy. Depression is an actual illness and should be approached with as much respect as other diseases. Your body knows something is wrong, and depression can be a chemical imbalance or unresolved emotions. Listen to your body and get it the help it needs.

Treatment Options

You need to seek help from a professional if you are suffering from clinical depression or even routine sadness. A professional can give you an accurate diagnosis, and inform you of any treatment options that are available. They can also tell you exactly what form of depression you have, which can make finding effective treatment options a lot easier.

If you have been diagnosed with clinical depression, you cannot expect it to be cured overnight. This is something that you may have to deal with for years to come. Since this is happening to you, the below article will offer you some comfort and teach you how to deal with these problems.

Symptoms of depression

Symptoms of depression

Take time to write in a journal if you are suffering from a depression. Allowing yourself to express your feelings, instead of repressing them is very healthy. Also, when you have symptoms that are bothering you, and you write these down, you may notice a pattern that may be causing you problems.

Even something as simple and fresh flowers can brighten your home and mood. Flowers, by their very nature, have evolved to be pleasing to many species, including humans. Take advantage of this, and try to have fresh flowers.

Avoid caffeine, alcohol and other drugs when depressed. When someone is dealing with depression, it can seem like alcohol or drugs may help, but it actually does more harm than good. Most times, this desire to drown feelings with drugs or drink will lead to dependency.

When it comes to depression, it is important to know that no matter what is wrong, you are not alone. This is essential to understand because everything seems much more difficult if you feel alone. Many people have the same issue, and there are always people that can help you.

Don’t avoid eating if you’re feeling depressed. Lots of times, sufferers of depression don’t consume any food because they’re too depressed to. Your body needs nutrients to survive; therefore, even if you do not feel like eating, you should try to eat a healthy snack.

Try to stay positive, no matter what is going on. Remaining positive puts you in the best position to discover a solution to whatever problems come along.

Try going green if you have depression. Many of the foods people eat in modern society are toxic to body and mind. The chemicals in these toxic ingredients can slow you down physically and even alter your brain chemistry. To avoid these toxins, buy organic. Most supermarkets offer organic products now.

Consider keeping a journal. It can help you monitor which events tend to set off your depressive moods. The more you can recognize when depression is going to strike, the more you can do to counteract it.

Negative Thoughts

Try your best to always stay positive. Of course, your negative thoughts tend to race when you’re depressed, so this will be a challenge. Try to keep track of negative thoughts and actions into words. Just getting out what you are thinking could make negative thoughts go away.

Try new experiences to keep life interesting. The feeling of being in the rut can strengthen your depression and cause a vicious cycle. The negativity begins to feed on itself and you begin to think that is all there is. Going outdoors and experiencing something new helps you to differentiate between your perceptions of reality and reality itself.

Battling depression can be made easier when you have sufficient, quality sleep under your belt. Restlessness and insomnia typically accompany depression, so aim to get 8 hours of sleep each night. Being active throughout the day will make you more likely to sleep well at night.

Focus on doing healthy things for yourself each day. Maintain your therapy sessions and participate in the activities that are suggested by your therapist. List the things that you want to talk to your therapist about. Your list should help keep you focused, and ensure that you’re talking about what you need to talk about rather than allowing your therapist to dictate the direction your session takes.

You should consider finding a support group that can help you manage your depression. If you talk to other people that are depressed, you will get some tips that you didn’t know and perhaps help them as well!

Don’t allow the more serious conditions to take hold if you suffer from depression. Before you fall victim to things like eating disorders and suicidal thoughts, use the tips you’ve read here to rise above the depression and to once again experience the joy of living. Take depression seriously, and work to defeat it.

Originally posted 2018-02-01 07:15:15.

PTSD Awareness Month

December 6th, 2018

What is PTSD?

PTSD Awareness Month – PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder) is a mental health problem that some people develop after experiencing or witnessing a life-threatening event, like combat, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault. It’s normal to have upsetting memories, feel on edge, or have trouble sleeping after this type of event. At first, it may be hard to do normal daily activities, like go to work, go to school, or spend time with people that care about you. But most people start to feel better after a few weeks or months. After trauma or life-threatening event, it is common to have reactions such as upsetting memories of the event, increased jumpiness, or trouble sleeping. If these reactions do not go away or if they get worse, you may have Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). If it’s been longer than a few months and you’re still having symptoms, you may have PTSD. For some people, PTSD symptoms may start later on, or they may come and go over time.

PTSD_Awareness_Month

PTSD Awareness Month

Table Of Contents

What is PTSD
Factors that Affect Those With PTSD
Symptoms of PTSD
Other Problems Associates With PTSD
Treatments Options for PTSD
Resources

 

Factors that Affect Those With PTSD

PTSD can happen to anyone. It is not a sign of weakness but simply a sign of a hectic occurrence. Some factors can increase the chance that someone will have PTSD, many of which are not under that person’s control. For example, having a very intense or long-lasting traumatic event or getting injured during the incident can make it more likely that a person will develop PTSD. PTSD is more common for certain types of trauma, like combat and sexual assault than other types of injury.

Personal factors, like previous traumatic exposure, age, and gender, can affect whether or not a person will develop PTSD. What happens after the traumatic event is as important as what happened when the injury occurred. Stress can make PTSD more likely, while social support can make it less likely.

Symptoms of PTSD

  1. Reliving the event (also called re-experiencing symptoms). You may have bad memories or nightmares. You even may feel like you’re going through the event again. This is called a flashback.
  2. Avoiding situations that remind you of the event. You may try to avoid situations or people that trigger memories of the traumatic event. You may even avoid talking or thinking about the event.
  3. Having more negative beliefs and feelings. The way you think about yourself and others may change because of the trauma. You may feel guilt or shame. Or, you may not be interested in activities you used to enjoy. You may feel that the world is dangerous and you can’t trust anyone. You might be numb, or find it hard to feel happy.
  4. Feeling keyed up (also called hyperarousal). You may be jittery, or always alert and on the lookout for danger. Or, you may have trouble concentrating or sleeping. You might suddenly get angry or irritable, startle easily, or act in unhealthy ways (like smoking, using drugs and alcohol, or driving recklessly.

Other Problems Associates With PTSD

People with PTSD may also have other problems like

  1. Feelings of hopelessness, shame, or despair
  2. Depression or anxiety
  3. Drinking or drug problems
  4. Physical symptoms or chronic pain
  5. Employment problems
  6. Relationship problems, including divorce

In many cases, treatments for PTSD will also help these other problems, because they are often related. The coping skills you learn in therapy can work for PTSD and these associated problems.

Treatments Options for PTSD

There are two main types of treatment namely Psychotherapy (sometimes called counseling or talk therapy) and medication. Sometimes people combine psychotherapy and medication to get better.

A. Psychotherapy can be divided into Trauma-focused psychotherapy and EMDR.
Trauma-focused psychotherapy can be divided into Cognitive processing therapy and Prolonged exposure.
Trauma-focused psychotherapy is a form of therapy that focuses on the memory of the traumatic event or its meaning. This seems to be the most effective treatment for PTSD, according to PTSD.va.gov
Trauma-focused psychotherapy can further be divided into two parts – Cognitive processing, and prolonged exposure.

Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) where you learn skills to understand how trauma changed your thoughts and feelings. Changing how you think about the trauma can change how you feel.
Prolonged Exposure (PE) where you talk about your trauma repeatedly until memories are no longer upsetting. This will help you get more control over your thoughts and feelings about the trauma. You also go to places or do things that are safe, but that you have been staying away from because they remind you of the trauma.
Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), which involves focusing on sounds or hand movements while you talk about the trauma. This helps your brain work through the traumatic memories.

B. Medications for PTSD
Medications can be effective too. Some specific SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) and SNRIs (serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), which are used for depression, also work for PTSD. These include sertraline, paroxetine, fluoxetine, and venlafaxine.

IMPORTANT: According to the government website, Benzodiazepines and atypical antipsychotics should generally be avoided for PTSD treatment because they do not treat the core PTSD symptoms and can be addictive.

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can occur after someone goes through a traumatic event like combat, assault, or disaster. Most people have some stress reactions after trauma. If the responses don’t go away over time or disrupt your life, you may have PTSD.

Resources

The National Center for PTSD is dedicated to research and education on trauma and PTSD. We work to assure that the latest research findings help those exposed to trauma.

 

Originally posted 2018-06-02 21:08:01.

Power of the Brain

December 5th, 2018

Harnessing the Power of the Brain

by Glenn Patton
Best practice for assessment and treatment of gait and balance after stroke.

2011 – What would you do if you couldn’t walk? To learn about the best practices for gait and balance recovery, it is helpful to imagine one morning you step out of the house, and while walking to your vehicle, you suffer a potentially devastating injury to your brain: a stroke. After lifesaving medical treatments, you learn your rehabilitation program will begin. Though you can use your arm again, and speak and think clearly, you have great difficulty standing and walking. You might find it promising to know that approximately 80% of people who survive a stroke regain the ability to walk, with or without an assistive device.

1 Deeper research, however, indicates you may find yourself one of the fewer than 50% of survivors who progress to independent community ambulation.

2 Now, you want to know what you can do to harness the power of your brain in helping to recover these functions. After a review of the best practices that follow, imagine how you might create your plan of care for rehabilitation.

ASSESSMENT OF GAIT AND BALANCE

Emdr TreatmentStroke survivors who arrive at Sheltering Arms, the acute rehabilitation hospital where I work as a physical therapist, often need to relearn how to walk. Sheltering Arms has created a program of inpatient and outpatient services that implement the latest evidence for assessment and intervention called the i-Walk Recovery Center. The first step in evaluating a patient’s prospects for functional recovery is to determine what impairments most limit the ability to walk and maintain balance. Are there deficits related to strength and range of motion? Is there involuntary movement, or spasticity, that keeps the affected limb from moving appropriately? Does the individual respond appropriately to balance challenges? Some of these areas make a bigger impact on walking than others, and the answers to these questions often guide the treatment plan.

Finding all the key elements for independent community ambulation can help achieve optimum assessment of gait and balance. A basic function of walking is the ability to perform a reciprocal stepping action. This may be limited to individuals who have suffered a stroke for one of the following reasons: impaired ability to support the body against gravity; inability to move the lower limb; inability to sustain muscle contraction; or impaired spatial awareness. If stroke survivors can step with both legs, then they also must be able to maintain balance during movement of the body forward, as well as adapt to the environment. These functional abilities can be tested with standardized outcome measures for gait and balance, such as the BERG Balance Scale, Dynamic Gait Index, Ten Meter Walk Test, and Timed Up and Go.
EVIDENCE-BASED TREATMENT

After a thorough assessment to determine factors related to walking and balance, and after developing an understanding of the stroke survivor’s own goals, a treatment plan is initiated. The i-Walk Recovery Center utilizes a practice guideline to implement the use of innovative technologies related to the recovery of walking and balance. The use of these technologies is based on principles of motor learning and neuroplasticity. It was not always known that the brain is capable of modifications after injury. I advise patients that most importantly, stroke survivors need to specifically practice the task of walking in an intense, novel, and repetitive way.

I also advise that by practicing walking they may experience errors from which the neural pathways will be stimulated to learn. In addition, they will be exposed to progressive balance challenges to reintegrate balance reactions into functional abilities. As I explain to patients about the physical demands associated with regaining the ability to walk, I introduce them to technology used to aid in this process. Advanced technology allows patients to put these principles into use while a therapist skillfully determines which technology will work for a patient at any given point in recovery- ie, right patient, right tool, right time.

Certain tools are available to help patients perform exercises essential to gait and balance recovery.  Behrman and Harkema describe four principles of locomotor training that explain how walking can be task-specific:

A) Weight-bearing must be maximized in the lower extremities,

B) Kinematics, or movement of the body and limbs, must be normalized,

C) Sensory feedback and input must be maximized, and

D) Compensation through a use of altered patterns or devices should be minimized.

E) Technology can be useful to make walking retraining task-specific, even when a stroke survivor is unable to stand or move the involved limbs. For instance, we may put a patient in a robotic device that stabilizes the body and assists or performs the movement of the lower extremities. Sheltering Arms uses robotic-assisted gait training to help a severely impaired individual walk several hundred feet instead of only a few steps. The device provides control of variables such as the amount of body weight support, treadmill speed, and amount of guidance of the lower extremities. All can be modified to progress the intervention within the robot.

An excellent way to improve kinematics and sensory feedback for walking training is to apply functional electric stimulation (FES) to the lower leg to prevent toe dragging. Sheltering Arms frequently uses an FES device designed to work by applying electrodes to the muscle and nerve that flex the foot up at just the right time during walking. Often a patient simply needs to figure out “how” to move his or her body, and the FES device is designed to provide that feedback. After using the device, stroke patients sometimes remark: “Oh, that is what I am supposed to do.” This technology can provide therapists the freedom to get patients practicing task-specific walking earlier. We observe patients are often more engaged and have less fear of falling.

New research shows that more intense tasks produce neurophysiologic changes in the brain.  Repetition is also known to be important in optimizing benefits of neuroplasticity for stroke recovery.

3 By applying advanced technology that provides body weight support (BWS), a therapist can completely transform the type of walking practice performed. BWS systems have been used with a treadmill for many years, but new systems allow walking over the ground with a ceiling-mounted track for more adaptability in walking practice. The BWS system used by Sheltering Arms staff provides therapists much more freedom to let patients move on their own. That freedom allows therapists to increase the difficulty of the task the patient is performing while maintaining safety for the patient and therapist.

When individuals commit errors while attempting to learn new tasks, it is natural for those errors to actually help improve the performance of the new task. Currently, researchers are studying whether the brain will better learn how to produce corrections and permanent adaptations by having a therapist induce or magnify an error. One technology included in this study is the split-belt treadmill. The split-belt device used at the i-Walk Recovery Center is engineered with two belts running side-by-side that can be run at the same speed or independently at different speeds. Initial research is promising in demonstrating changes in gait over the ground after a stroke survivor practices walking faster while only the lower extremity is taking a shorter step. The result is often a more symmetrical pattern.

Discover What is Possible Diagnosing Mental Health

The future seems to promise more advanced medical treatment of stroke, and a greater ability to detect and enhance changes in a damaged brain. Through the use of evidence-based assessment and interventions performed by a physical therapist, augmented with advanced technologies, you can discover what is possible when you harness the power of the brain.

Want to find out more about Rehab Management Rehab Management

Harnessing the Power of the Brain

Originally posted 2017-01-13 00:06:37.

EMDR for PTSD

December 5th, 2018

Practice guidelines have identified the treatments that have the most evidence for treating PTSD. The best treatments include different talk therapies (or psychotherapy) and medications. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is one of these treatments.

What Type of Treatment Is This?

EMDR is a psychotherapy for PTSD. EMDR can help you process upsetting memories, thoughts, and feelings related to the trauma. By processing these experiences, you can get relief from PTSD symptoms.

How Does EMDR Work for PTSD?

 

 

 

After trauma, people with PTSD often have trouble making sense of what happened to them. EMDR helps you process the trauma, which can allow you to start to heal. In EMDR, you will pay attention to a back-and-forth movement or sound while you think about the upsetting memory long enough for it to become less distressing. Although EMDR is an effective treatment for PTSD, there is disagreement about it works. Some research shows that the back and forth movement is an important part of treatment, but other research shows the opposite.

What Will I Do?

During the first stage, you will learn about physical and emotional reactions to trauma. You and your provider will discuss how ready you are to focus on your trauma memories in therapy. To prepare, you will learn some new coping skills. Next, you will identify the “target”, or the upsetting memory you want to focus on–including any negative thoughts, feelings and bodily sensations related to the memory.

You will hold the memory in your mind while also paying attention to a back-and-forth movement or sound (like your provider’s moving finger, a flashing light, or a tone that beeps in one ear at a time) until your distress goes down. This will last for about 30 seconds at a time, and then you will talk about what the exercise was like for you. Eventually, you will focus on a positive belief and sensation while you hold the memory in your mind. Towards the end of treatment, your provider will re-assess your symptoms to see if you need to process other targets.







What Are the Risks?

You may feel uncomfortable when focusing on trauma-related memories or beliefs. These feelings are usually brief and people tend to feel better as they keep doing EMDR. Most people who complete EMDR find that the benefits outweigh any initial discomfort.

Group or Individual?

EMDR is an individual therapy. You will meet one-to-one with your provider for each session.

Will I Talk in Detail about My Trauma?

No, in most cases you will not be asked to talk about the details of your trauma out loud. But you will be asked to think about your trauma in session.

Will I Have Homework?

No, EMDR does not require you to complete homework or practice assignments between sessions.

How Long Does Treatment Last?

About 1-3 months of weekly 50-90 minute sessions. But, many people start to notice improvement after a few sessions. And the benefits of EMDR can last long after your final session with your provider.

This is an article from the public library for public knowledge.  More information can be found at EMDR for PTSD

Originally posted 2016-10-23 02:45:12.

VA Compensation And Claims

December 4th, 2018

VA Compensation – This document provides a quick, step-by-step overview of the VA claim process and the VA claim exam. Mental Health Exam Factsheet

As a Veteran who may be planning to file or has recently filed a VA compensation or pension claim, we know that you may have questions about the claim process and what to expect. After you submit your claim, an important part of the claim decision process may include a VA claim exam, also known as a compensation and pension (C&P) exam. We’ve created some useful resources to help you know what’s next in the claim process and what to expect during a VA claim exam. Check out and share this helpful information.

VA Claim Process Step-by-Step

va_compensation_list

Disability Compensation is a tax-free monetary benefit paid to Veterans with disabilities that are the result of a disease or injury incurred or aggravated during active military service. Compensation may also be paid for post-service disabilities that are considered related or secondary to disabilities occurring in service and for disabilities presumed to be related to circumstances of military service, even though they may arise after service.

Generally, the degrees of disability specified are also designed to compensate for considerable loss of working time from exacerbations or illnesses.

The benefit amount is graduated according to the degree of the Veteran’s disability on a scale from 10 percent to 100 percent (in increments of 10 percent). Compensation may also be paid for disabilities that are considered related or secondary to disabilities occurring in service and for disabilities presumed to be related to circumstances of military service, even though they may arise after service. Generally, the degrees of disability specified are also designed to compensate for considerable loss of working time from exacerbations or illnesses.

 

Originally posted 2016-10-02 08:10:02.

Stress

December 4th, 2018

Stress is one of the most overlooked and under-appreciated problems in modern life.  In this article, we’ll be interchanging the word “stress” with “tension”, “stiffness”, and “tautness”.  Tension can lead to an extreme headache.  Tension headache is the most common type of a headache.  This type of a headache can cause mild or moderate pain in the head, neck, and behind the eyes. Some patients say that a tension headache feels like a tight band around their foreheads.Diet, sleep, and exercise are all important, but mental and physiological stress will undermine your best attempts at anything unless you manage them.

examining_StressYou don’t have to go to the same lengths that most people did, but you will get better results just by taking some simple steps mentioned below.

Stress is the disruption of homeostasis and is not always bad. In regards to exercise, stress is needed to produce training adaptations. In order to learn, you need to stress your brain in new ways — learning a new language, solving a math problem, creating a new business/product, etc.. Humans are designed to handle small, intermittent bouts of stress. When tension becomes chronic, it becomes a disease.

You may feel there’s nothing you can do about tension. The bills won’t stop coming, there will never be more hours in the day, and your work and family responsibilities will always be demanding.  But you have more control over tension than you might think.  Stress management is all about taking charge: of your lifestyle, thoughts, emotions, and the way you deal with problems.  No matter how tensed your life seems to be, there are steps you can take to relieve the pressure and regain control.

Problem of Stress and Tension

Tension holds you back in all aspects of life. It weakens your immune system, costs you precious time that should be spent enjoying life.  Stiffness hurts your interpersonal relationships and alienates others. It decreases your ability to make rational decisions and perform at work. Tension sucks.

It’s easy to identify sources of tension following a major life event such as changing jobs, moving home, or losing a loved one, but pinpointing the sources of everyday tension can be more complicated.  It’s all too easy to overlook your own thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that contribute to your tension levels.  Sure, you may know that you’re constantly worried about work deadlines, but maybe it’s your procrastination, rather than the actual job demands, that is causing the stiffness.

Stress can advance to dangerous levels, threatening your physical, emotional, and mental wellbeing. When it does, feelings of isolation and helplessness can be amplified to heights you may have never experienced before. In such a scenario, outreach, whatever form it takes, has to be your anchor. Here are some emergency symptoms to watch out for, all of which might suggest an intense level of stress that requires an intervention of some kind. From there, we explore the organizations and people you can turn to in order to receive support and treatment when you need it.

Stress is an epidemic.  It is one of the most widespread and debilitating conditions in the world, yet many people act as if it is completely natural.  If there was one thing that could be called the antithesis of The Bulletproof Executive — it is stress.  Tension sucks up the reserves you should be using to create more resilience. Stress may even trigger the onset of dementia. In one study, 5 72 percent — nearly three out of four — Alzheimer’s patients had experienced severe emotional tautness during the two years preceding their diagnosis.

Tension is most likely to be harmful when the following conditions are present: it feels against your will, out of your control and utterly devoid of meaning. If you can change any of these conditions – by finding some meaning in it – you can reduce the harmful effects of stress.

Signs And Symptoms of Stress

Physical symptoms of stress include such digestive disorders as those mentioned above, plus ulcers, heartburn and indigestion, headaches, high blood pressure, palpitations, breathing problems (such as asthma or hyperventilation), overheating, exhaustion and insomnia, back or muscle ache, skin rashes (such as hives or eczema­ma), excessive sweating, and nervous disorders (such as twitching, grinding teeth, or picking at skin).

At the same time, Cortisone has the effect of suppressing the immune system, so all immune defi­cient illnesses (from the common cold to cancer) can be directly or indirectly caused by stress.

The physical symptoms of stress are themselves distressing. In fact, the body’s response to stress can feel so bad that it produces additional mental stress. During the stress response, then, mind and body can amplify each other’s distress signals, creating a vicious cycle of tension and anxiety.

Types of Stress And Tension

Many types of stress are similar in essence but have different characteristics. For example, stress experienced by teenagers is probably no different than much of the stress adults have, but because teens tend to respond differently than adults to certain stressful situations there might be different ways to handle it.

There are different types of stress — eustress, acute and chronic stress disorders.

  1. Acute tension is the most common type of tension. It’s your body’s immediate reaction to a new challenge, event, or demand, and it triggers your fight-or-flight response.
    Severe acute tension such as tension suffered as the victim of a crime or life-threatening situation can lead to mental health problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder or acute stress disorder.
  2. Episodic acute tension – When acute tension happens frequently, it’s called episodic acute tension. People who always seem to be having a crisis tend to have episodic acute tension.
  3. Chronic tension – If acute tension isn’t resolved and begins to increase or lasts for long periods of time, it becomes chronic tension. This tension is constant and doesn’t go away.

All of these types have effects on your body. Some types of effects of tension and stiffness on your health are helpful while some are harmful. The acute and chronic types can weaken your immune system. But the chronic type makes you more vulnerable to cancer.

Effects of Stress on the Body

Effects of stress on the body can also lead people to cope strategies that worsen their stress and their health. For example, some people smoke, overeat, or abuse alcohol or drugs as a reaction to stress. These strategies may seem to temporarily relieve stress, but they then contribute to overall poor health and risk factors for disease. Such methods of coping can snowball with stress into much higher risk factors for heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke.

The effects of stress on the body are numerous and are risk factors for a number of medical conditions. However, a small amount of stress, especially in a dangerous situation can have certain beneficial consequences. One frequently reads of people who are able to do extraordinary things under stress, like lifting cars to free trapped children. Constant, or chronic stress, on the other hand, is often associated with health risks instead of benefits.

Other effects of stress on the body include an increased heart rate, rapid breathing, and a redirection of blood flow to the muscles and brain. Normal digestive patterns tend to slow down because less blood flow is directed to the digestive tract. Chemicals that help form platelets also are released, and one may note perspiration, and tense muscles as being caused by stress.

Solution To Reduce or Eliminate Stress

By rewiring your brain using a newly found therapy called EMDR, and nervous system to handle tension more efficiently, you will become a more effective person in all walks of life, and the tension you do experience will be the kind that makes you stronger.

Physical activity plays a key role in reducing and preventing the effects of pressure, but you don’t have to be an athlete or spend hours in a gym to experience the benefits. Just about any form of physical activity can help relieve pressure and burn away anger, tension, and frustration. Exercise releases endorphins that boost your mood and make you feel good, and it can also serve as a valuable distraction to your daily worries.

While the maximum benefit comes from exercising for 30 minutes or more, you can start small and build up your fitness level gradually. Short, 10-minute bursts of activity that elevate your heart rate and make you break out into a sweat can help to relieve worry and give you more energy and hopefulness. Even very small activities can add up over the course of a day. The first step is to get yourself up and moving.

Social engagement is the quickest, most efficient way to rein in pressure and avoid overreacting to internal or external events that you perceive as threatening.  Expressing what you’re going through can be very cathartic, even if there’s nothing you can do to alter the demanding situation. There is nothing more calming to your nervous system than communicating with another human being who makes you feel safe and understood. This experience of safety—as perceived by your nervous system—results from nonverbal cues that you hear, see and feel.

If tension happens too often or lasts too long, it can have bad effects. It can be linked to headaches, an upset stomach, back pain, and trouble sleeping. It can weaken your immune system, making it harder to fight off disease.  If you already have a health problem, stiffness may make it worse. It can make you moody, tense, or depressed. Your relationships may suffer, your sexual life could be affected, and you may not do well at work or school.

Stress is an unavoidable factor in our modern day lives. Practise many techniques like meditation, yoga, nature walking and others along with therapy, if need be. You should be more consistent with whichever route you decide to take.

stress_and_tension_breathing_exerciseBreathing is something we do on a daily basis. The body, in a living state, breathes involuntarily whether we are awake, sleeping, or actively exercising. Breathing is living. It is a vital function of life.

In yoga, we refer to this as pranayama . Prana is a Sanskrit word that means life-force and Ayama mean extending or stretching. Thus, the word “pranayama” translates to the control of life force. It is also known as the extension of breath. Every cell in our bodies needs oxygen to function properly. So it’s no surprise that research shows that a regular practice of controlled breathing can decrease the effects of stress on the body and increase overall physical and mental health.

Thus, the word “pranayama” translates to the control of life force. It is also known as the extension of breath. Every cell in our bodies needs oxygen to function properly. So it’s no surprise that research shows that a regular practice of controlled breathing can decrease the effects of stress on the body and increase overall physical and mental health.  If you ask me, I’ll tell you exercise is the best solution.

Originally posted 2016-09-21 23:21:42.

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