Tag Archives: ptsd

Is EMDR Right for You? 5 Signs You Could Benefit from This Powerful Therapy

Is EMDR Right for You? 5 Signs You Could Benefit from This Powerful Therapy

Trauma can leave deep scars on our lives, impacting our mental and emotional well-being long after the event itself. While the journey towards healing is unique to each individual, EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) therapy has emerged as a powerful tool for many survivors to process traumatic memories and reclaim their lives.

But how do you know if EMDR is the right approach for you? Here are 5 key signs that might indicate you could significantly benefit from this innovative therapy:

1. You Struggle with Persistent Symptoms of PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common consequence of trauma, characterized by intrusive thoughts, flashbacks, nightmares, hypervigilance, and emotional dysregulation. If you find yourself constantly reliving the traumatic event, experiencing intense emotional distress, and avoiding situations that trigger these memories, EMDR can be a highly effective way to address the core of these symptoms.

2. You Experience Anxiety or Depression Linked to Trauma

Trauma often leads to the development of anxiety and depression. You might find yourself constantly worried, struggling to cope with daily tasks, or experiencing feelings of hopelessness and despair. EMDR therapy can help you identify the underlying traumatic experiences contributing to these symptoms and reprocess them in a way that reduces their emotional impact.

3. You Have Difficulty Managing Difficult Emotions

Trauma can make it challenging to manage strong emotions like anger, fear, and sadness. You might find yourself easily overwhelmed, struggling to express your feelings in a healthy way, or resorting to unhealthy coping mechanisms. EMDR helps you process these emotions associated with the traumatic memory, leading to a more balanced emotional state.

4. You Have Negative Beliefs About Yourself or the World Stemming from Trauma

Trauma can often lead to the development of negative self-beliefs, such as “I’m not good enough” or “The world is a dangerous place.” These beliefs can significantly impact your self-esteem and relationships. EMDR therapy can help you challenge these negative thought patterns and develop a more positive and empowering sense of self.

5. You’re Open to Exploring New Approaches to Healing

EMDR therapy is a unique and effective approach to healing, but it might not be the right fit for everyone. It requires an openness to exploring the emotional landscape of trauma and a willingness to engage in the therapeutic process. If you’re ready to try a new approach and actively participate in your healing journey, EMDR could be a transformative experience.

Remember: While these signs can indicate potential benefits from EMDR, it’s crucial to consult with a qualified EMDR therapist to determine if this approach is the best fit for your specific needs and circumstances. A therapist can conduct a comprehensive assessment and guide you towards the most suitable path for your healing journey.

EMDR therapy offers a powerful tool for individuals seeking to heal from the effects of trauma. By recognizing the signs that might point towards its potential benefits, you can take a significant step towards reclaiming your life and emotional well-being.

Resources

EMDR therapy - Rewire_your_brain_from_ptsd_trauma

EMDR therapy – Rewire your brain.

Here are some resources that can be helpful for individuals considering EMDR therapy:

EMDR International Association (EMDRIA):

  • Website: https://www.emdria.org/
  • This is the leading organization for EMDR therapy, offering a wealth of information about the therapy, including:
    • What is EMDR therapy?
    • How does EMDR work?
    • Conditions treated with EMDR
    • Finding an EMDR therapist
    • Client brochures (adult and child versions)
    • Online resources for therapists

Other helpful resources:

  • The National Center for PTSD: https://www.ptsd.va.gov/
    • Provides information and resources related to PTSD and trauma, including information on various treatment options like EMDR.
  • The Jed Foundation: https://www.jedfoundation.org/
    • Offers resources and support specifically for mental health issues in teens and young adults, including information on trauma and treatment options.
  • The National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE
    • Provides confidential support and resources for survivors of sexual assault, including information on trauma recovery.
  • The Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline: 1-800-422-4453
    • Offers crisis intervention and support for child abuse victims and their families.

It’s important to remember that these resources are for informational purposes only and should not be a substitute for professional medical advice. If you are considering EMDR therapy, it’s crucial to consult with a qualified mental health professional to determine if this approach is right for you and to develop a personalized treatment plan.

Rewire-Your-Brain-to-Fight-PTSD

Unleash the Power of Your Mind: The Ultimate Guide to EMDR Therapy!

In our daily lives, we encounter a variety of challenges. Stress, trauma, and anxiety are but a few hurdles that countless people experience. But what if there was a revolutionary therapy capable of mitigating these burdens and fostering mental well-being? Enter Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), a unique therapeutic approach that can help individuals overcome various psychological issues.

Understanding EMDR

EMDR, developed in the late 1980s by Dr. Francine Shapiro, is a form of psychotherapy that aids people in processing and integrating traumatic memories to reduce their long-term impact (1). It’s designed to heal the symptoms of trauma that linger in our minds, obstructing us from living our lives to the fullest.

The theory behind EMDR is that our brains can naturally recover from traumatic experiences, much like our bodies heal physical wounds. However, certain traumatic events can overwhelm this natural process, leaving emotional wounds that don’t heal on their own. EMDR therapy stimulates the brain’s natural healing process by having patients recall traumatic experiences while the therapist guides their eye movements (1).

How EMDR Works

EMDR therapy generally follows an eight-phase approach, each designed to ensure that every aspect of a traumatic experience is thoroughly addressed (2).

  1. History Taking: The therapist assesses the client’s history to understand their life experiences and identify potential targets for EMDR processing.
  2. Preparation: The therapist prepares the client by explaining the EMDR process and teaching them several self-control techniques.
  3. Assessment: The target traumatic memory is activated, and the client identifies the image, negative belief, associated emotions, and body sensations related to it.
  4. Desensitization: The therapist leads the client in sets of eye movements (or other bilateral stimulation) with appropriate breaks to process the memory.
  5. Installation: The therapist helps the client to replace the negative belief with a positive one.
  6. Body Scan: The client is asked to think of the target memory and the new positive belief, then note any residual physical sensations.
  7. Closure: The therapist ensures the client leaves each session feeling better than or as good as at the start.
  8. Reevaluation: At the beginning of subsequent sessions, the therapist checks to ensure that the positive effects of previous sessions have been maintained (2).

EMDR Effectiveness

A substantial body of research supports EMDR’s effectiveness in treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A meta-analysis of 26 randomized controlled trials found EMDR to be as effective as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for reducing symptoms of PTSD and maintained these effects over time (3). EMDR is also recognized as an effective form of treatment for trauma and PTSD by the American Psychiatric Association, the World Health Organization (WHO), and the Department of Defense (4).

EMDR has also shown promise in treating a range of other mental health issues, including anxiety, depression, and panic disorders, although more research is needed to firmly establish its effectiveness for these conditions (5).

The Power of EMDR

The power of EMDR lies in its capacity to transform lives by equipping individuals with the means to process trauma. It’s a tool that can empower individuals to unleash the healing capabilities of their own minds.

Remember, it’s important to consult with a professional healthcare provider when considering EMDR therapy. Mental health matters and it’s crucial to find the therapy and therapist that are right for you.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is a widely recognized and well-studied treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The therapy aims to reduce the long-term psychological impact of traumatic memories by activating the brain’s natural healing process.

Here’s how EMDR therapy works in the context of PTSD:

1. History and Treatment Planning: Initially, the therapist and client will go over the client’s history, identifying traumatic memories that will be the focus of EMDR treatment. This often involves creating a treatment plan that targets specific memories, current incidents causing distress, and future scenarios that might trigger PTSD symptoms.

2. Preparation: The therapist explains the EMDR process to the client, equipping them with various stress reduction techniques they can use during and between sessions. The aim is to establish a trusting therapeutic relationship and ensure the client feels safe and in control.

3. Assessment: The therapist helps the client select a specific traumatic memory to work on. The memory is deconstructed into an image that represents the memory, a negative belief about oneself, related emotions, and body sensations.

4. Desensitization: The therapist guides the client’s eye movements (or uses another form of bilateral stimulation such as hand-tapping or audio stimulation) while the client focuses on the traumatic memory and their physical and emotional responses. This process is believed to engage the brain’s natural adaptive information processing mechanism.

5. Installation: The goal is to replace the negative belief associated with the traumatic memory with a positive one. The client is asked to hold the traumatic memory in mind along with the new positive belief while the therapist continues with the bilateral stimulation.

6. Body Scan: The client is asked to think about the traumatic memory and the positive belief, and then to notice any residual physical sensations. If there are any negative sensations, these are targeted with additional sets of eye movements.

7. Closure: Each EMDR session aims to ensure the client leaves feeling as good or better than at the start. The client may be asked to keep a log during the week documenting any related material that may arise.

8. Reevaluation: The therapist checks the client’s progress at the start of subsequent sessions, ensuring that the positive effects of previous sessions have been maintained, and identifying any new areas that need treatment.

In PTSD, the traumatic event can continue to have a significant negative impact on the individual’s life. EMDR therapy helps by allowing individuals to process these traumatic events, reducing their psychological impact and alleviating PTSD symptoms. Importantly, EMDR therapy should be administered by a trained professional within a comprehensive treatment plan.

Several studies have found EMDR to be effective in treating PTSD. For instance, a 2016 meta-analysis published in the Psychological Bulletin found that EMDR was as effective as cognitive-behavioral therapy for reducing symptoms of PTSD and that these effects were maintained over time (1).

Unlock your mind’s potential, and let the healing begin.

References

  1. Shapiro, F. (2018). Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy: Basic principles, protocols, and procedures (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  2. EMDR Institute, Inc.
  3. Cuijpers, P., Karyotaki, E., Weitz, E., Andersson, G., Hollon, S. D., van Straten, A. (2016). The effects of psychotherapies for major depression in adults on remission, recovery and improvement: a meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 142(3), 293-317.
  4. World Health Organization
  5. American Psychological Association
  6. Cuijpers, P., Karyotaki, E., Weitz, E., Andersson, G., Hollon, S. D., van Straten, A. (2016). The effects of psychotherapies for major depression in adults on remission, recovery and improvement: a meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 142(3), 293-317.

Originally posted 2023-07-12 16:15:40.

Sleep and ptsd

Getting Quality Sleep At Night

Getting Quality Sleep At Night – Productive sleep solutions are around for anyone with any sleep issue. As part of our effective sleep solutions, the following paragraphs will answer many of the questions you might have. Who am I? and Why am I writing about sleep quality? Well, I am a United Veteran who has experienced firsthand what sleep deprivation does to the body. I am also an avid learner of how to reverse the side effect of sleep deprivation and how it relates to the symptoms of PTSD.

The Benefits of Getting Quality Sleep

Sleep provides each body’s cells with the ability to throw out waste plus the opportunity to repair themselves.  To ensure a recovery period from such fatigue, we undergo the periodic loss of awareness known as sleep.  Sleep is undoubtedly an important function, even though we may delay going to sleep, it will take over.

Sleep can be a usual and necessary component of our survival inside them for hours a good sleep solution plan’s essential to thinking processes. As everyone rests, the entire body rejuvenates, ensuring it will be ready to function properly morning. What happens whenever your body gets an excessive amount of or inadequate sleep?  As their pharmaceutical counterpart causes the force on the body, therefore, you become easily irritated and grumpy. After you sleep you happen to be giving one’s body a mini-vacation.  Sleep also gives the human brain a chance to work things out.

GettingqualitySleep

The beautiful girl sleeps in the bedroom

While it just isn’t known what functions occur in the brain while you’re sleeping, it can be believed that the next step is that the brain sorts and store information, replace chemicals or corrects imbalances, and solves problems by the body processes.
Sleep is a term unconscious state, and it’s essential to a healthy body.  It refreshes the entire body and the mind, so it helps the body heal from trauma throughout the day. If you get enough sleep regularly each night you will feel and are better.

Sleeping and waking are a component of your internal clock controlled by your brain.  Just how much sleep should an individual get nightly? The amount of sleep one needs depends on a great deal of his or her age. As one example babies sleep about 14-15 hours, while seniors need only 7-8 hours nightly. Most kids between 5 and 12 yrs. old somewhere involving need 10 to 11 hours of sleep. Some kids might have more and some need less. However, will any of us have less than 8 hours of sleep? Learn more!

It all depends on the individual. Some individuals need a wide range of sleep, and some require a minimum of sleep.  The person needs to have the amount of sleep important to feel alert, healthy, and fit.  What’s available is dragging during the night, then he must get more sleep. A lot of people may require more sleep greatly assist their circadian rhythm as well as their metabolism. Their processes may need more time, so they really may need more sleep to unwind and restore themselves.

Skipping one night’s sleep can produce a person irritable and inept.  Each person misses two nights of sleep, the face will have problems thinking and doing things. As their pharmaceutical counterpart can no longer do their normal tasks at the same time.  After five nights without sleep, an individual hallucinates. Eventually, the brain can’t present its directions to the rest of the body without sleep.

The number of sleep not just affects your mortality but in addition your personality. Several people are of course long sleepers, and several are short sleepers. Research shows that people, who tend to sleep longer, tend to be introverted and creative. Those who require less sleep tend to be extroverted and concrete.

Regardless of whether you are a long sleeper or perhaps a short one, getting too few hours of sleep may make you cranky and much less energetic, as the majority of individuals have probably experienced. Continual sleep disorders can lead to mental issues, for instance, depression, deprive one of thinking clearly, and hinder the product’s work.

Originally posted 2021-03-18 19:57:25.

Rewire-Your-Brain-to-Fight-PTSD

How to Rewire Your Brain to Fight PTSD

How to Rewire Your Brain to Fight PTSD

Understanding how to rewire your brain can help you bounce back from a traumatic experience. During combat or other violent situations, your brain changes its rhythms, resulting in post-traumatic stress disorder.

The good news is that you can rewire your brain to help you fight PTSD and cope better with it. Many therapists can help you rewire your brain and your mind with techniques that can be used to treat PTSD. Luckily, you don’t really need to go to a professional to achieve this aim.

According to the National Library of Medicine, MRI images and findings of a person suffering from PTSD show the brain’s prefrontal cortex and amygdala are disrupted. When the right frontal cortex (the watchtower) is activated, and the left frontal cortex (the fire alarm) becomes dim, then rewiring is needed to prevent the traumatic brain event from repeating itself in the future.

Rewire Through Assisted Therapy
This process involves the use of medication and a combination of a process called EMDR. EMDR – Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, which uses guided eye movements to teach the brain how to deal with traumatic memories, can help you overcome these symptoms. Read more about EMDR here.

Exposure Therapy
Using exposure therapy, psychologists can help people change their thinking patterns and rewire their brains to fight PTSD. This approach relies on the experimental paradigm of extinction learning.

Rewire Your Brain Through Neurofeedback
The treatment for PTSD isn’t a simple fix. While some medications will only temporarily relieve your symptoms, neurofeedback can help you heal from PTSD. During a neurofeedback session, you’ll be able to control your emotions.

Rewire Through Assisted Therapy
This process involves the use of medication and a combination of a process called EMDR. EMDR – Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, which uses guided eye movements to teach the brain how to deal with traumatic memories, can help you overcome these symptoms. Read more about EMDR here.

Exposure Therapy
Using exposure therapy, psychologists can help people change their thinking patterns and rewire their brains to fight PTSD. This approach relies on the experimental paradigm of extinction learning.

Rewire Your Brain Through Neurofeedback
The treatment for PTSD isn’t a simple fix. While some medications will only temporarily relieve your symptoms, neurofeedback can help you heal from PTSD. During a neurofeedback session, you’ll be able to control your emotions.

Dr. Caroline Leaf’s Book
“Switch on Your Brain: The Key to Peak Happiness, Thinking, and Health,” offers strategies to rewire the brain and eliminate anxiety, trauma, shame, and bad habits.

Rewire_your_brain_from_ptsd_trauma

Rewire your brain. Image by Gino Crescoli from Pixabay

“MRI findings have implicated that brain regions associated with PTSD pathophysiology include the medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, insula, lentiform nucleus, amygdala, hippocampus and parahippocampus, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, cuneus, fusiform and lingual gyri, and the white matter tracts connecting these brain regions” (nih.gov).

When the amygdala is overactive, the window of tolerance for new information is reduced. People with PTSD have difficulty focusing, learning new information, and managing logical thought. Using trauma-informed treatments can help you rewire your brain.

The first step is to be self-aware of your triggers and understand why you may react to them in certain ways. This can be challenging, but it is necessary to remember that the amygdala is responsible for processing emotions and memories.

How to Rewire Your Brain by Using Dr. Caroline’s Method

The first solution to rewiring your brain is by reading a book by Dr. Caroline. “Switch on Your Brain: The Key to Peak Happiness, Thinking, and Health.” The book offers strategies to rewire the brain and eliminate anxiety, trauma, shame, and bad habits. The book focuses on the power of thoughts and how they affect the brain’s structure and function. Dr. Leaf explains that by changing our thinking patterns, we can change our brain structure, leading to positive changes in our behavior and emotions.

Dr. Caroline introduces a 5-step process called the “Switch on Your Brain 5-Step Learning Process,” which involves gathering information about the situation, focusing on the positive and constructive thoughts and emotions that you want to have, understanding the biological and spiritual aspects of the brain and the mind-body connection, using your memory to create repetition and practice to strengthen new neural pathways, and finally the application phase which includes incorporating the new thinking patterns into your daily life to form new habits.

Gathering: Becoming Aware of Our Negative Thought Patterns and Emotions

In this step, the goal is to become aware of our negative thought patterns and emotions. Dr. Leaf emphasizes the importance of being mindful of our thoughts and emotions because they have a direct impact on our brain structure and function.

Negative thoughts and emotions, such as anxiety, trauma, shame, and bad habits, can create toxic patterns in the brain that can lead to negative behaviors and emotions. By becoming aware of these negative patterns, we can begin to change them.

Dr. Leaf suggests that we start by observing our thoughts and emotions throughout the day. We can write them down or simply take mental notes of them. It’s important not to judge or suppress these thoughts and emotions but to simply observe them and acknowledge their presence.

By gathering information about our negative thought patterns and emotions, we can begin to identify triggers and patterns. This information can then be used in the subsequent steps of the learning process to help us rewire our brains and create positive changes in our behavior and emotions.

The gathering step is an essential first step in the process of rewiring the brain. It requires self-awareness and a willingness to observe and acknowledge our negative thought patterns and emotions without judgment.

Focusing: Directing Our Attention to the Positive and Constructive Thoughts and Emotions We Want to Have

In this step, the goal is to direct our attention to the positive and constructive thoughts and emotions we want to have. Dr. Leaf emphasizes that where we focus our attention has a direct impact on our brain structure and function. If we focus on negative thoughts and emotions, we reinforce negative neural pathways in the brain. However, if we focus on positive thoughts and emotions, we can create new and positive neural pathways.

Dr. Leaf suggests that we start by identifying the thoughts and emotions we want to cultivate. For example, instead of focusing on anxiety or shame, we might focus on feelings of calm or self-acceptance. We can then practice directing our attention to these positive thoughts and emotions throughout the day.

One technique Dr. Leaf recommends for focusing is called “the 21-day detox,” where you will intentionally focus on positive thoughts and emotions for 21 days straight. By doing this, you can begin to create new neural pathways in the brain, reinforcing positive thoughts and emotions and weakening negative ones.

Dr. Leaf also suggests using affirmations and visualization to help focus on positive thoughts and emotions. We can create affirmations that reinforce positive beliefs about ourselves and visualize positive outcomes to reinforce positive emotions.

The focusing step is all about intentionally directing our attention to positive thoughts and emotions to create new neural pathways in the brain. With practice and repetition, this can lead to positive changes in our behavior and emotions.

Understanding: Learning About the Biological and Spiritual Aspects of the Brain and the Mind-Body Connection

In this step, the goal is to learn about the biological and spiritual aspects of the brain and the mind-body connection. Dr. Leaf emphasizes the importance of understanding how our thoughts and emotions affect our brain structure and function.

Dr. Leaf explains that our brain is constantly changing and adapting based on our experiences and thoughts. Our thoughts and emotions create neural pathways in the brain, which can either be positive or negative. By understanding how our thoughts and emotions affect our brains, we can begin to take control of our mental and emotional well-being.

Dr. Leaf also emphasizes the importance of the mind-body connection. She explains that our thoughts and emotions have a direct impact on our physical health. Negative thoughts and emotions can lead to physical symptoms, such as headaches or stomachaches. On the other hand, positive thoughts and emotions can improve our physical health and well-being.

One way to gain a better understanding of the brain and the mind-body connection is to read books or attend seminars on the topic. Dr. Leaf’s book, “Switch On Your Brain,” is a great resource for learning about the brain and the mind-body connection.

Another way to gain a better understanding is to practice mindfulness and meditation. Mindfulness involves being present at the moment and observing our thoughts and emotions without judgment. By practicing mindfulness, we can become more aware of how our thoughts and emotions affect our physical and mental well-being.

Overall, the understanding step is about gaining knowledge about the brain and the mind-body connection. By understanding how our thoughts and emotions affect our brain and physical health, we can begin to take control of our mental and emotional well-being.

Memory: Using Repetition and Practice to Strengthen New Neural Pathways

In this step, the goal is to use repetition and practice to strengthen new neural pathways. Dr. Leaf emphasizes the importance of repetition in creating new neural pathways in the brain. With practice and repetition, we can reinforce positive thoughts and emotions and weaken negative ones.

One technique Dr. Leaf recommends for memory is called “write, reflect, and apply.” This involves writing down positive thoughts and emotions and reflecting on them to reinforce them in our memory. We can then apply these positive thoughts and emotions in our daily lives, practicing them regularly to strengthen the associated neural pathways.

Another technique Dr. Leaf recommends is visualization. By visualizing positive outcomes and emotions, we can reinforce the associated neural pathways in the brain. This technique can be particularly effective when combined with repetition and practice.

Dr. Leaf also emphasizes the importance of rest and sleep in strengthening new neural pathways. During sleep, the brain consolidates new information and strengthens neural pathways.

Overall, the memory step is about using repetition and practice to strengthen new neural pathways in the brain. By repeating positive thoughts and emotions and visualizing positive outcomes, we can create new and positive neural pathways that reinforce positive behaviors and emotions. Read about the memory step here.

Application: Incorporating the Newly Found Thinking Patterns Into Our Daily Lives to Form New Habits

The goal of this step is to incorporate the new thinking patterns that you created from the earlier step into your daily lives to form new habits. Dr. Leaf emphasizes the importance of applying the knowledge and techniques we have learned in the previous steps to our daily lives. By doing so, we can create new habits that reinforce positive thoughts and emotions.

Dr. Leaf suggests starting with small, achievable goals and gradually building on them. For example, if your goal is to cultivate feelings of calm and relaxation, you might start by taking a few deep breaths throughout the day or practicing mindfulness for a few minutes each day. As we become more comfortable with these practices, we can gradually increase the time and frequency of the practices.

Another technique Dr. Leaf recommends for application is to surround yourself with positive influences. This might include spending time with supportive friends and family, reading uplifting books, or listening to positive music. By surrounding yourselves with positive influences, we can reinforce positive thoughts and emotions and create a supportive environment for your new habits.

Dr. Leaf also emphasizes the importance of self-compassion and patience in the application process. Creating new habits takes time and effort, and it’s important to be kind and patient with yourselves as you work toward your goals.

The application step is about incorporating the newly found thinking patterns from your previous step into your daily lives to form new habits. By starting small and building gradually, surrounding yourselves with positive influences, and practicing self-compassion and patience, we can create lasting positive changes in your behavior and emotions.

Dr. Leaf also discusses the importance of meditation, prayer, and gratitude in rewiring the brain and promoting mental and emotional well-being.

Overall, the book offers practical strategies and insights to help readers take control of their thoughts and rewire their brains for a more positive and fulfilling life.

 

 

Rewire Through Assisted Therapy

This process involves the use of medication and a combination of a process called EMDR. EMDR – Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, which uses guided eye movements to teach the brain how to deal with traumatic memories, can help you overcome these symptoms. Read more about EMDR here.

When you experience a traumatic event, your brain’s responses will likely be triggered by adrenalin. This will cause your brain to disconnect from your reasoning part, which will not allow you to rationalize. This means you won’t be able to rewire your brain, but you can use these techniques to help your brain cope. If you can learn to stop reliving your experiences, you can heal from PTSD.

Exposure Therapy

Using exposure therapy, psychologists can help people change their thinking patterns and rewire their brains to fight PTSD. This approach relies on the experimental paradigm of extinction learning. By training the brain to forget a memory, a person can move on with their life. During a stressful relapse, this technique can cause panic or a relapse. However, the process is a long one that can take time and requires persistence.

Rewire Your Brain Through Neurofeedback

The treatment for PTSD isn’t a simple fix. While some medications will only temporarily relieve your symptoms, neurofeedback can help you heal from PTSD. During a neurofeedback session, you’ll be able to control your emotions. Moreover, the therapy will help you remember your experiences, which is key in preventing relapses. The process of rewiring your brain will make your PTSD symptom-free and less severe.

The treatment for PTSD isn’t a simple fix. While some medications will only temporarily relieve your symptoms, neurofeedback can help you heal from PTSD. During a neurofeedback session, you’ll be able to control your emotions. Moreover, the therapy will help you remember your experiences, which is key in preventing relapses. The process of rewiring your brain will make your PTSD symptom-free and less severe.

One of the most important parts of the brain, the hippocampus, is affected by PTSD. This region regulates memory and the ability to differentiate between past and present experiences. The damage to the hippocampus causes sufferers to be confused, easily distracted, and unable to differentiate between past and present experiences. The result is that these individuals are often unable to distinguish between their past and present experiences.

While neurofeedback can help you rewire your brain to rewire your PTSD symptoms, it can be difficult to remember the details. When the fear of danger strikes, the hippocampus kicks in and helps to regulate emotions. As the trauma passes, the amygdala resumes its normal functions, and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex completes the circuit. This is an important part of the treatment process and can help you rewire your brain to fight PTSD.

In conclusion, you can rewire your brain by using Dr. Caroline’s 5-step process, assisted therapy, exposure therapy, and neurofeedback.

 

References

  • https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31515885/
  • https://1emdr.com/blog-emdr-therapy/
  • American Psychiatric Association, DSM-5 Task Force. Posttraumatic stress disorder. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing; 2013. p 271-280.
  • Koenen KC, Ratanatharathorn A, Ng L, et al. Posttraumatic stress disorder in the World Mental Health Surveys. Psychol Med 2017;47:2260-2274.
  • Shalev A, Liberzon I, Marmar C. Post-traumatic stress disorder. N Engl J Med 2017;376:2459-2469.
  • Benjet C, Bromet E, Karam EG, et al. The epidemiology of traumatic event exposure worldwide: Results from the World Mental Health Survey Consortium. Psychol Med 2016;46:327-343.
  • Berger W, Coutinho ES, Figueira I, et al. Rescuers at risk: A systematic review and meta-regression analysis of the worldwide current prevalence and correlates of PTSD in rescue workers. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 2012;47:1001-1011.

Originally posted 2021-11-20 04:26:22.