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How to Rewire Your Brain to Fight PTSD and Trauma

Written by Onaolapo Adeyemi. Posted in Alternative Trauma, Military, ptsd

PTSD Symptoms – Rewire Your Brain to Fight PTSD Symptoms and Trauma

PTSD symptoms and trauma according to the VA Web site is a mental health problem that can occur after someone goes through a traumatic event like war, assault, an accident or disaster.  After a trauma or life-threatening event, it is common to have reactions such as upsetting memories of the event, increased jumpiness, or trouble sleeping. Note that you don’t have to go to war before you can experience such reactions.  People with bad bosses at work or kids that are being picked upon by bullies tend to have these symptoms.  If these reactions do not go away or if they get worse, you may have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, also known as (PTSD).  I enjoy writing and sharing all these information to the public because of my own experience with PTSD symptoms.  I understand what these men and women who have served are going through because I am a wounded warrior.  Please share as you read, and watch these videos.  The information could be of help top someone you know.  I found this video on National  Geographic Television.

 

Video credit – Credit to National Geographic Television.  More information on this new technique can be found at Http://Channel.NationalGeographic.Com/channel/brain-games/videos/defusing-ptsd/

What are the symptoms of PTSD?

PTSD Symptoms and Side effects of PTSD might disturb your life and make it difficult to proceed with your everyday exercises. You might think that it’s hard just to traverse the day.

There are four sorts of PTSD symptoms and side effects:

  1. Reliving the event (also called re-experiencing symptoms)

Memories of the traumatic event can come back at any time. You may feel the same fear and horror you did when the event took place. For example:

    • You may have nightmares.
    • You may feel like you are going through the event again. This is called a flashback.
    • You may see, hear, or smell something that causes you to relive the event. This is called a trigger. News reports, seeing an accident, or hearing a car backfire are examples of triggers.
  1. Avoiding situations that remind you of the event

You may try to avoid situations or people that trigger memories of the traumatic event. You may even avoid talking or thinking about the event. For example:

    • You may avoid crowds because they feel dangerous.
    • You may avoid driving if you were in a car accident or if your military convoy was bombed.
    • If you were in an earthquake, you may avoid watching movies about earthquakes.
    • You may keep very busy or avoid seeking help because it keeps you from having to think or talk about the event.
  1. Negative changes in beliefs and feelings

The way you think about yourself and others changes because of the trauma. This symptom has many aspects, including the following:

    • You may not have positive or loving feelings toward other people and may stay away from relationships.
    • You may forget about parts of the traumatic event or not be able to talk about them.
    • You may think the world is completely dangerous, and no one can be trusted.
  1. Feeling keyed up (also called hyperarousal)

You may be jittery or always alert and on the lookout for danger. You might suddenly become angry or irritable. This is known as hyperarousal. For example:

    • You may have a hard time sleeping.
    • You may have trouble concentrating.
    • You may be startled by a loud noise or surprise.
    • You might want to have your back to a wall in a restaurant or waiting room.

PTSD Assistance

Written by Onaolapo Adeyemi. Posted in EMDR, Military, ptsd

How To Help Someone With PTSD

PTSD_Assistance

PTSD Assistance – When thinking about how to help someone with PTSD manage it ca be a challenge. Even when you see obvious symptoms present themselves it does not mean that the matter will be quickly and efficiently addressed at this point

The National Center for PTSD is dedicated to research and education on trauma and PTSD. We work to assure that the latest research findings help those exposed to trauma.

The main thing to bear in mind is that the person in question will need your love and support. If someone is attempting to face the issue that affects them psychologically in this way they can often feel trapped and alone. You can work to relieve these anxieties by giving them some personal assurances which will prove very valuable to them

In ensuring this is something they can rely upon you’re helping them take a big step. We all need levels of compassion but when people are facing something such as post-traumatic stress disorder this is even more as and by showing this level of patience and care it allows them to focus on ways of overcoming the issues they face.

PTSD is just one of the possible effects of trauma. People experience a range of reactions following a traumatic event. This section will help you to learn more about other common problems and reactions related to experiencing trauma. For Veterans, also see the VA Mental Health website.

ptsd_facesIt’s also useful to accept your limitations in this regard in an honest fashion. We all have individual strengths and weaknesses when we’re trying to address problems and there will be things you’re not good at. This is when it is best to look to professional help to make noticeable changes.

 

After a trauma or life-threatening event, it is common to have reactions such as upsetting memories of the event, increased jumpiness, or trouble sleeping. If these reactions do not go away or if they get worse, you may have Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

They have the knowledge and experience to look at the psychological roots of the situation and they can then offer advice and guidance in order to allow them to cope better managing their condition.

PTSD is common among soldiers and the government are doing everything they could to help save the soldiers involved from self-destruction.

The “military uses different methods to treat PTSD. One way is using acupuncture.”

http://www.statesman.com/news/local/military-tries-acupuncture-to-treat-troops-for-ptsd-757786.html

“At the time of the study (the middle to the late 1980s, among Vietnam veterans, approximately 15% of men and 9% of women were found to currently have PTSD. Approximately 30% of men and 27% of women had PTSD at some point in their life following Vietnam” http://ptsd.about.com/od/ptsdandthemilitary/a/Vietnamlongterm.htm

 

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